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Adaptive cruise control

Technical Articles July 23, 2018

Adaptive cruise control

Adaptive cruise control (or active cruise control) systems build on the convenience of a conventional cruise control system by automatically changing speed to match a vehicle in front. When testing and developing such systems, it’s important to know precisely when and how the system intervenes, how well it acquires and tracks targets and how it performs in a number of different real-world scenarios. Measurements such as target bearing, distance, relative velocity and time-to-collision are key to the evaluation of these systems.

What the RT and RT-Range S delivers

  • Relative accuracy 2 cm
  • Heading accuracy 0.1°
  • Real-time birds eye view showing measurements
  • Ability to track multiple objects in real-time
  • Perfectly suited to open-road testing

ACC testing with OxTS RT-Range

Getting the measurements you need

To get accurate vehicle-to-vehicle measurements, an RT inertial navigation system and RT-Range Hunter is installed in the vehicle under test (VUT) and any target vehicles. RT-XLAN Wi-Fi radios then send real-time information from target vehicles back to the  VUT where the RT-Range Hunter calculates, logs and outputs real-time measurements about the relative position of the target vehicles. The measurements being output included the position of both the Hunter and target vehicles, orientation and velocity. The current status of the ACC hardware can also be logged with the data via a CAN bus interface, or later synchronised with the measurements via a GPS timestamp.

In addition to single-point measurements, the RT-Range S can calculate measurements between vehicles using a boundary perimeter shape that considers the relative position and orientation of vehicles, and as the system does not need line of sight, it can also be used to evaluate how the ACC system performs around corners.

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